Nicolas Magand on the internet

Comments about tech, media, nature, &c.

My name is Nicolas Magand and I live in Paris, France. I work as a social media and engagement editor at the Global Editors Network, a non-profit aimed at promoting innovation and sustainability in the news industry. Here I blog mostly about tech and media, but many other topics can face my enthusiasm.

Filtering by Tag: laptop

What a typical afternoon spent working in a café looks like

Daniel Benneworth-Gray, detailing a typical working-in-a-café schedule:

14:15

Still going. No distractions. The uniform inauthenticity of this place is emphasised by the corporate art adorning the walls: canvas-printed stock images of beautiful Italian folk, drinking what appears to be far superior coffee in a proper café, somewhere sun-drenched and rustic. There are scooters, cobbles. Fresh fruit tumbles gaily from a punnet. It’s a Mediterranean coffee-drinking ideal so far removed from the one I’m actually experiencing, it’s as if I’m actively being mocked for my custom. When I do occasionally peer up from my screen, the immediate response of “well this is all slightly awful, I bet I should have some strong opinions about their tax arrangements” is enough to push my gaze back down again.

14:25

My unnamed buddies have left. I’m suddenly conscious that I look like a complete twerp, making dramatic swooshes on my screen.

If you have ever spent some time trying to do some work in a café, you will nod in agreement at every sentence of this piece.

How good is the new iPad Pro for photographers?

His work with the iPad was already mentioned briefly, but Austin Mann's full explanations, tips and details are worth the read. This part, among all the gorgeous photos of Iceland, caught my attention:

I was working with Mavic Pro 2 1  in the black volcanic deserts of south Iceland. While sitting in the car (in the middle of the desert, in the middle of nowhere), I decided to offload my images and review them. I pulled out the iPad Pro and a card reader, and within only a few moments I was reviewing them on screen. Next thing I knew I was editing them with the Pencil in Lightroom CC and then I shared one with my wife—all within just a few moments.

It’s really easy to sit just about anywhere (even with a steering wheel in your face) and not just use it, but use it to its full extent.

This is precisely what is the most tempting aspect of the iPad: not only its ease of use, but the fact that you actually want to use it. On my MacBook Air, whenever I want to edit photographs, I know I have to sit down at my desk, open up the laptop, type in my password, launch Lightroom 2 , load the pictures, and then – only then – can I start editing them. The editing process is not that smooth either 3 . The iPad doesn't seem to suffer from any of this.

The Hasselblad I’m shooting with (H6D-100c) captures 100-megapixel images. Each RAW file is 216MB (about 7x the size of a RAW file from a Canon 5D MK IV). Needless to say, these files are HUGE and if the iPad Pro can handle them, it can handle virtually any RAW image.

Long story short, it performed extremely well.


  1. This is a drone model: I had to look it up myself. ↩︎

  2. Adobe, if you're reading this, you know Lightroom is 2008-slow: fix it. ↩︎

  3. I can't really blame my MacBook: it is an entry model from early 2015. It is not only too old for this, but never really built to be a champion at this. ↩︎

The new iPad Pro

When the day of replacing my good old MacBook Air will sadly come, I want to consider the iPad Pro as a candidate. As Apple unveiled the new version last week and the reviews got published today, I thought I would check if my main use cases would be improved, possible, and enjoyable.

My main three use cases would be web browsing, writing, and photo editing. Obviously the web browsing experience would be different but somehow much improved – the simple thought of reading my Instapaper list on a screen like the iPad's is dreamy, especially coming from a non-retina 11" Air. For the other – secondary – use cases, I can still use the computer from work. The perfect portability and the screen quality of the iPad Pro alone, in my opinion, justify considering it as my next main computing device.

So I focused my reviews reviewing process on two things: the keyboard accessory 1 , and Lightroom.

Chris Velazco, on Engagdet:

writing this story on the iPad's Smart Keyboard has been relatively painless: It's still covered in the same liquid-resistant fabric, which feels odd, but it's perfectly usable even for long stretches of drafting. And Lightroom CC has been terrific at editing the photos I imported onto the iPad

Matthew Panzarino, at TechCrunch:

The general effect here is that the Smart Keyboard is much much more stable than previous generations and, I’m happy to report, is approved for lap use. It’s still not going to be quite as stable as a laptop, but you can absolutely slap this on your knees on a train or plane and get work done. That was pretty much impossible with its floppier predecessor.

John Gruber, on Daring Fireball:

At the hands-on area after last week’s event, Apple was showing Adobe Lightroom editing 50 megapixel RAW images from a Hasselblad camera. The photos were by Austin Mann, who was there, and helpfully demoed the software, showing what a real pro photographer would do in real life with real images. The experience was completely fluid and instantaneous.

Jeffrey Van Camp, on WIRED:

Photographers and video editors might like the new storage options. The Pro comes with 64GB of memory by default, but you can bump that number as high as 1TB. And since this tablet has a USB-C charging port, you can more easily connect it to a camera, external monitor, and other accessories.

Geoffrey A. Fowler 2 , on the Washington Post:

Inside the new iPad, there’s also a new A12X chip Apple says is more powerful than 92 percent of laptops available on the market. It was robust enough to handle any processing task I sent its way, including editing and sorting through thousands of photos in Adobe’s Lightroom. (Next year, Adobe says it will bring to the iPad Pro a full-fledged version of its Photoshop app, too.)

A new kind of port on the iPad Pro can also drive a second screen. I plugged it into my office monitor just like I do my laptop.

Well, consider me convinced. 3 


  1. I am just talking about the typing comfort here: I already know that the copying and pasting, the switching tabs process, and the lack of touchpad may require some getting used to. ↩︎

  2. I tried to find a review written by a woman, but apparently, that is not as easy to find as I hoped↩︎

  3. The cheapest model is still quite expensive, but that may well enough for my needs. ↩︎